Mat Campbell Music

Composer. Arranger. Conductor. Percussionist. Educator.

 Education

Mathew’s philosophy on education builds upon the life lessons and experience he has learned from his teachers and professors. His philosophy is that:

If the teacher only shows the students facts without justification, the student will only know facts. If the teacher shows the student how to learn through justification and association, the student will be able to use these tools in their lifelong pursuit of knowledge.


Classroom Experience

Mathew completed the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley Office of Educator Preparation Accountability program in Fall 2016 under the mentoring of Mr. Guy McKinney (Secondary) and Mr. Roel Flores (Primary) at Mercedes ISD in Mercedes, Texas.

Mathew consulted with Weslaco ISD (Weslaco High School Cluster) in Spring 2017 under the leadership of Mr. Rodrigo Leal and Mr. Ernie Ortiz.

Mathew is certified by the Texas Education Agency to teach music in all levels (EC-12). He has been a member of the Texas Music Educators Association (TMEA) since 2013.


Notable Teachers

Grade School

Ernie Ortiz

Aaron D. McMichael

Raymond Chapa

Albert Salazar

Matt Little

Willie Perez

Marco Gandaria

Jorge Mujica

University of Texas Rio Grande Valley - School of Music (Undergraduate)

Dr. Tom Nevill

Dr. Martha Placeres

Dr. Carol McNabb-Goodwin

Prof. David Lopez

Prof. Allen Clark

Dr. Mark Eichenberger

Dr. Joe W. Moore III

Prof. Sally Sandoval (Clinical Teaching Primary Supervisor)

Dr. Albert Lo (Clinical Teaching Secondary Supervisor)

Oklahoma City University - Wanda L. Bass School of Music (Graduate School)

Dr. Matthew Mailman (MM Conducting Advisor)

Dr. Edward Knight (MM Composition Advisor)

Prof. Patrick Womack

Dr. Jacob Johnson (Lecture Recital Advisor)

Prof. Jeffrey Grogan

Dr. Randi von Ellefson

Dr. Jan McDaniel


Mathew was featured in an article written by University of Texas Rio Grande Valley reporter Amanda Taylor in July 2019.

UTRGV alumnus Mathew Campbell – an award-winning music composer and educator – was part of the University Scorpion Scholars Program provided by legacy institution UTB-TSC and graduated from UTRGV in 2016 with a bachelor’s degree in Music Education. He won the 2015 Percussive Arts Society Composition Contest and has premiered multiple works at Texas Music Educator’s Conferences in 2015, 2016 and 2017, as well as at the National Flute Convention in 2013, and the International Clarinet Convention in 2016. He recently earned double master’s degrees in Music Composition and Conducting from Oklahoma City University, where he was an educator. Campbell recently moved back to the Rio Grande Valley to return to his roots and spread his love for music to his community.

BROWNSVILLE, TEXAS – Mathew Campbell, a UTRGV alumni, has transformed music from a creative hobby to a lifelong passion and career.

Campbell is an award-winning composer and educator, taking what he loves about music and turning it into art and curriculum for students.

“Music education is important to education as a whole because it can bring the art of being human to an academic setting,” he said. “Music brings the subjectivity to education where other subjects do not.”

Campbell graduated from UTRGV with a bachelor’s in Music Education in 2016. He chose to attend UTRGV after being accepted into the University Scorpion Scholars Program provided by legacy institution The University of Texas at Brownsville (UTB) and Texas Southmost College (TSC).

Campbell studied under the direction of Dr. Joe W. Moore III, assistant professor in percussion ensemble within the School of Music, who encouraged Campbell to submit to composition contests. He attributes Moore’s guidance and mentorship to guiding him down the path of success.

‘‘Perhaps my fondest memory at UTRGV was having my composition recital in Spring 2016. It was incredibly rewarding to put in so much hard work and show myself what I could do to take ideas in my head that only I imagined into tangible moments of artistry.
— Mathew Campbell

“My biggest accomplishment as a composer was winning the 2015 Percussive Arts Society Composition Contest,” Campbell recalled. “I was encouraged by my professor at the time, Dr. Joe W. Moore III, to compose and submit a piece. Well, to my surprise, I won the first composition contest I ever submitted to. I could not be more thankful for his (Moore’s) help, encouragement and friendship.”

Campbell has had multiple musical works premiered at Texas Music Educator’s Conferences in 2015, 2016 and 2017, as well as at the National Flute Convention in 2013 and the International Clarinet Convention in 2016. 

The San Benito, Texas native recalls his early years growing up in the Rio Grande Valley and taking trips to the mall in Harlingen to look at instruments. The piano was the first instrument that struck his interest. 

“I have always been interested in music. I want to say my first memory of anything musical would be going to Valle Vista Mall in Harlingen, Texas, and playing on the pianos at Mr. Music - though they always had the strict ‘DO NOT PLAY’ sign,” Campbell said.

By the age of 8, Campbell was taking his first lessons on a piano and a drum set.

While at UTRGV, Campbell was able to participate in various “real life” scenarios within the world of teaching, composing and conducting. Campbell said that working toward a career in music is different from the more objective career paths, since there are intricacies that happen on a personal level through the process of art.

“Other subjects teach objective things where you’ll always get the same right answer when you ask the same questions,” Campbell said. “Music doesn’t always need to have a right answer. This gray area gives humans the ability to weigh options and make decisions.”

As a recent master’s graduate from Oklahoma City University, Campbell has moved back to the Rio Grande Valley to return to his roots and spread his love for music to his community. 

He touches on the past and recollects some of his best memories from his time as an undergrad at UTRGV. One ensemble, in particular, stands out as an important milestone in his life. 

“Perhaps my fondest memory at UTRGV was having my composition recital in Spring 2016. It was incredibly rewarding to put in so much hard work and show myself what I could do to take ideas in my head that only I imagined into tangible moments of artistry,” he said.

“Capping off the recital was a 17-minute-long work for clarinet, percussion quartet and electronics named Perigee-Syzygy. Iris, then my girlfriend, was playing the clarinet part. Right after the recital, I proposed to her outside of the venue.

“The best part? She said yes.”